Capitol Hill Insurrection
News | Politics

Capitol Hill Insurrection

In AD 410 Alaric led his army of Visigoths into Rome and ransacked the city. By then Rome was no longer the capital of the western Roman Empire, but this single event sent shock waves throughout the known world. How could the founding city of the greatest empire in history be so vulnerable to barbarian…

A busy year
Opinion

A busy year

The past year has been a difficult one for many people round the globe, including our family. But it has also brought undoubted blessings, and these have made my life fuller and busier than I could have imagined a short time ago. Now I am embarking on a new venture for which I hope to…

J.I. Packer
Arts & Culture | Bible | Reformed

J.I. Packer

While the mainstream media often portray North American evangelicals as easily-led sheep blindly following the most notorious of television preachers, those in the know will recognize that a handful of British authors have been far more influential, including C.S. Lewis, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, John R. W. Stott and James Innell Packer, all of whom have now…

Americans to the Polls
News | Politics

Americans to the Polls

Next month Americans return to the polls to elect a president and vice-president, members of Congress, and host of state- and county-level officials. They do so at a time of unprecedented crisis for the country. What happens on 3 November will have an impact on its future as we enter the third decade of this…

Theodore Koyzis (1928-2020)
Family Life | History | Opinion

Theodore Koyzis (1928-2020)

It is never easy to lose a loved one. It is especially difficult when the loved one is such an extraordinarily loving and gifted man as was my father. Theodoros Antoniou – his given name – was born in the village of Koma tou Yialou, in a part of Cyprus now under Turkish occupation, to Antonios Georgiou and Pezouna Theodorou.

Hagia Sophia No Longer a Museum
History | Opinion

Hagia Sophia No Longer a Museum

Last month it was reported that a Turkish court has cleared the way for the historic Hagia Sophia, an ancient Roman church built by the Emperor Justinian in the 6th century, to return to its former use as a mosque. Known as Ayasofya to the Turks, it functioned as a Muslim place of worship between 1453…

When Sunday is No Longer Sabbath
Opinion

When Sunday is No Longer Sabbath

During a visit to Jerusalem 25 years ago, I had an interesting experience that highlighted the importance of Sabbath for observant Jews. Our group was visiting the Western Wall, the sole remaining portion of Herod’s Temple following its destruction by the Romans in AD 70. As a long-time personal journal keeper, I sat down near the wall and began to record the experience.

Four Lessons from Lockdown Life
Opinion

Four Lessons from Lockdown Life

More than two months into the COVID-19 lockdown, we are all showing signs of strain. Nevertheless, I can attest to having learnt several lessons out of this unprecedented emergency. First, we can be thankful that the pandemic occurred when it did rather than 20 or so years ago. Because we are all increasingly linked together via the world wide web and various social media, many of us are able to carry on with our lives and work

Westminster’s 300th Anniversary
Opinion

Westminster’s 300th Anniversary

Last year we observed the 400th anniversary of the establishment of the first parliamentary assembly in the Americas. In 1619 the Virginia General Assembly was convened, thereby setting a precedent for the development of representative constitutional government in the English-speaking colonies. This year we celebrate another anniversary that contributed especially to our Westminster form of government.

Government vs. Virus
Opinion

Government vs. Virus

Over the past two centuries, the pace at which we have succeeded in taming our environment has accelerated, tempting us to assume that we are in nearly absolute control over our own lives and futures. Although my grandparents lived through the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic, many millions did not. The last flu pandemic took place when I was 13, killing one million people worldwide and 100,000 in the United States. As a boy I was afflicted, like virtually all of my peers, with the “normal” childhood diseases such as measles, rubella and the mumps.

The Unlikely Growth of Christianity in Iran
Church Life | News

The Unlikely Growth of Christianity in Iran

The ancient kingdom of Persia plays a prominent role in the Bible, especially in the Old Testament. It was Persia that put an end to the Babylonian empire and allowed the Judeans to return to their homeland after three generations in exile. Moreover, the Persian king Cyrus permitted the Jews to rebuild their temple, decades after Nebuchadnezzar had destroyed Solomon’s fabled predecessor. The Persians themselves were once Zoroastrians, followers of an ancient dualistic religion largely replaced by Islam in the 7th century AD. Persian culture retained a certain prestige status in the Near East, and the Ottoman Turks took on elements of both Persian and Byzantine cultures as they built their own imperial legacy.

Entering Into God’s Rest
Reviews

Entering Into God’s Rest

Easily the best book I read during the recently departed year was James W. Skillen, God’s Sabbath with Creation: Vocations Fulfiled, the Glory Unveiled. Although Skillen is well-known as a political scientist and retired leader of the Center for Public Justice in the United States, in his latest book he turns his attention to that branch of theology known as eschatology, or the study of the last things. In so doing, he has come up with an intriguing approach that feels fresh but is in reality utterly faithful to Scripture and to the historic creeds.