Quirky humour blended with a passion for conservation
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Quirky humour blended with a passion for conservation

Author Bibi Dumon Tak blends quirky wit, scientific knowledge, and conservation facts with poems formatted as modern communication techniques to draw young readers into the world of creatures with hooves. In an email conversation between a wild boar and a pig, a radio announcement about a cape buffalo, a 911 call about a mountain goat,…

The gift of literacy

The gift of literacy

Based on the life of Clarence Brazier, born August 28, 1906, in a log farmhouse near Magnetawan, Ontario, this compassionate, informative children’s picture book relates how “for nearly one hundred years, Clarence had a big secret.” The third of seven children, Clarence and his family worked hard to survive. Big for his age, Clarence readily…

Saying goodnight with love and imagination
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Saying goodnight with love and imagination

Before his death in 2019, Lee Bennett Hopkins, renowned children’s poet, anthologist, and author of more than one hundred books, compiled this selection of gentle, imaginative goodnight poems by 13 poets. A child’s bed, pillow, blanket, rocking horse, book, and more are celebrated. Creatures like dogs are appreciated. Dreams are anticipated. Guardian angels are welcomed….

A uniquely illustrated Christmas tale
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A uniquely illustrated Christmas tale

Young Jo, her infant brother, and ill, single mother are cast out into the elements on Christmas Eve. Though Jo plans to leave town on a bus with her family, the fierce, unruly winter wind pushes them in the direction of Franklin Murdoch’s barn and house. Jo is afraid of the man, known in the community as mean and crusty; the death of his wife and baby on a Christmas Eve long ago had apparently turned him into a nasty person.

Fun, Friendship, and Adventure on a Harvesting Journey

Fun, Friendship, and Adventure on a Harvesting Journey

Written in English and Anishinaabemowin, this historically-based children’s picture book portrays what life was like for one child and his community in Duck Bay, Manitoba. Elder Norman Chartrand of the Saulteaux-Metis Anishinaabek nation relates how, when he was a child in the 1940s, he and his family left their home on a two-day journey by wagon to Duck Mountain. There they gathered with many others from surrounding communities to spend a month picking blueberries.

Bravery and Sacrifice in a Complicated World

Bravery and Sacrifice in a Complicated World

Twelve-year-old Petra – nicknamed Pet – lives with her parents and 16-year-old sister Mags in a lighthouse on the South East coast of England. Their lighthouse, called the Castle, is a short distance from Europe, where Hitler’s armies are advancing against France. Pet is a timid girl. When she panics, she feels as if she has turned to stone.

Fostering Friendship with Refugees Through Sports

Fostering Friendship with Refugees Through Sports

Set in present-day England, Home Ground is part of a series of soccer stories which include pertinent facts for middle school readers. This novella relates the story of a losing soccer team. One of the players, Jordan, is arrogant and refuses to be a team player. He insists that the team’s losses are everyone else’s fault, including Sam’s, one of his teammates.

Hope, Despite the Facts that Can’t Be Changed

Hope, Despite the Facts that Can’t Be Changed

Twelve-year-old Hanako knows what it’s like to be rejected. She’s already spent four years as a prisoner, forced along with her family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans into internment camps by the United States’ government order after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Now, though World War II has ended, the American government is coercing thousands of Japanese-Americans to renounce their citizenship, and return to Japan, a country many have never been to. Hanako, her younger brother, and her parents are part of the returning throng.

A Message of Hope

A Message of Hope

Narrated in Swahili and English, this vividly illustrated children’s picture book set in Tanzania relates the story of Ngama, a boy too old to be considered a child and too young to be deemed a man. One day a car arrives in Ngama’s village – a rare occurrence – and he wonders who the visitor is. His father, the chief of their clan, tells him that the country’s leader visited the village to ask the clansmen to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, the tallest mountain in Africa, and light a candle at the summit to mark Tanzania’s independence.