Does Seeing = Believing?
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Does Seeing = Believing?

“Doubting Thomas,” that practical, no-nonsense disciple of Jesus, would fit well in our modern world’s philosophy that “seeing is believing.” Thomas would have nothing to do with fantastical stories of a risen Jesus. No, Thomas wanted empirical proof – the proof of his senses. He wanted to see the wound in Jesus’ side and touch the scars in his pierced hands.

Why Get Schooled?
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Why Get Schooled?

In my last column (June 8), I wrote that, “Going to university or technical school has never and will never save anyone, irrespective of whether one majors in philosophy or computer engineering. Only the sacrificial death of the Lord Jesus can do that.” If this is indeed the case, why would a young Christian person attend a college or university at all, especially since it’s expensive and may not even lead to a well-paying job?

Will Computers Outsmart Us by 2040?

Will Computers Outsmart Us by 2040?

The Greek philosophers believed that the acquisition of certain forms of analytic knowledge would set a person free from ignorance and lead to certain understanding of the Good. From this Greek notion came the belief that a liberal arts education is somehow essential to the making of good people. Even today, within some circles (both Christian and secular) there is a strong belief in the almost salvific value of a liberal arts education.

Isolate or Inoculate?

Isolate or Inoculate?

There have been many words of tribute in this newspaper to former CC editor, Bert Witvoet. My interactions with Bert were limited to a few exchanges I had with him when he was Editor of the Christian Educators’ Journal in the 1990s. I do recall that Bert was released from his Christian high school teaching position for daring to expose his students to J.D. Salinger’s novel Catcher in the Rye.

The Venereal Game

The Venereal Game

Lest you, gentle reader, think that there has been some mistake by me, the author, and by Angela Reitsma Bick, CC’s editor, in writing and publishing a column about lewd and lascivious matters, let us hasten to assure you that this is not the case. The game I am talking about here pertains (originally) to the naming of groups of animals that one would hunt. Venery (from the Latin venari, to hunt) means “sports of the chase” or simply: hunting.

RAK or PAK

RAK or PAK

Apparently, I missed two very important days this past November. First, I missed World Kindness Day on November 13, and, a little later, the even more important Random Acts of Kindness Day, November 29. Wikipedia tells me that Random Acts of Kindness Day (RAK Day) was first created in Denver Colorado in 1995, but it achieved real traction in New Zealand in 2004 and has since spread to many other parts of the world. In order not to miss out on this important day in 2020, I am hereby giving you important advance notice that RAK Day will be celebrated in North America this coming Sunday, February 17.

Un-invented

Un-invented

In 1999 I bought a 1984 Volkswagen Westfalia Camper Van in a moment of futuristic nostalgia. At the time of its purchase it already had about 350,000 km on the odometer, but I thought it might still have enough life left to produce many fond memories of family road trips and camping pleasure without the pain of on-the-ground tenting. Dubbed by my wife Louisa as “Bob’s bright green pleasure machine” (see photo), it served us valiantly and well (though not economically) for about 10 years.

Democracy?

Democracy?

I am not a political scientist but, it seems to me that, in a democratic election, it would be fair to assume that the number of seats won by the various parties would be proportional to the number of people who voted for members of these parties. Below is a chart that makes it clear that this has (again) not happened in the recent federal election. Proportional Representation voting results would have (barely) given us a minority Conservative government with the Liberals a very close second. In addition, there would have been far greater representation of MPs from the New Democrats and Greens, with six fewer members of the Bloc.

Whose Money is it Anyway?

Whose Money is it Anyway?

A couple of weeks ago, I was asked to present a workshop for The King’s University’s Interdisciplinary Studies conference titled, “Should Private Schools Get Public Dollars?” I presented the workshop to two different groups of about 30 students each. Remarkably, before I began my presentation, I asked the students to give a quick response to the question posed by its title and about half the students in each session answered, “No.” I say “remarkably” because these were King’s students in Edmonton, Alberta, who are attending a “private” university at which they pay at least double the tuition charged to local “public” ones.