Be Not Afraid
News | Theology & Spirituality

Be Not Afraid

“Patient Evangelism” (CC, Nov. 26, 2018) introduced two missionary families in a Muslim-majority West African nation. One worked in pioneering evangelism deep in the interior. In the more cosmopolitan capital, however, Christian witness is highly visible, with many churches and Christian schools part of the city’s fabric. There Antoine Kalebona* mentors pastors, school administrators and teachers. While I was visiting the Kalebonas, Antoine and I attended worship in the same building that is a classroom and office Monday through Friday.

Patient Evangelism
News | Politics

Patient Evangelism

In one West African Muslim nation that is open to Christian workers and missionaries, one sending agency is attempting to develop two distinct modes of working in that challenging religious climate. Eight hard hours by all-wheel drive vehicle from the capital city, the McIntyre family has been living in a modest house near the outskirts of a small village for over 15 years. (For the sake of security, all names used here are pseudonyms.) As the only Christians and Caucasians residing permanently in the region, they have spent their lives developing relationships among villagers and civil leaders in the town as well as in hundreds of other rural settlements scattered throughout the region. Because they are fluent in the regional language, they have established trusting friendships.

Religious Minority
News | Politics

Religious Minority

Early one morning in mid-March, two experienced North American ESL teachers and I stepped into a van in central Cairo for a three-hour drive to a city in Upper Egypt. Once past Cairo’s vast metropolitan area, traffic thinned. As we rode on the arrow-straight, six-lane divided highway, with endless desert on both sides, the women prepped me about their unusual work.

Transforming Nairobi
Church Life | News | Politics | Theology & Spirituality

Transforming Nairobi

In Kenya, the Prosperity Gospel is a “heresy that attracts poor people,” Pastor Dr. Wang’ombe says, “but it doesn’t base its plan on any work ethic. Rather it tells people to pray and just wait for results. Worse, it exploits the poor by requiring them to ‘plant seeds,’ [which] really means, ‘give to enrich a few leaders.’ We need to give hope to oppressed people who need to see biblically sound values of God’s Kingdom in practice.”