An exemplary exploration of evangelism

An exemplary exploration of evangelism

Evangelicals today are rather embarrassed about doing evangelism. In part this is due to our wanting to distance ourselves from the reality of immoral approaches to evangelism practiced by the church, both present and past. But, as John Fletcher points out in the conclusion to his book, perhaps there is a more telling and current reason for our embarrassment about evangelism.

Crisis in the cubicle
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Crisis in the cubicle

“What do you like to read?” Most readers have an answer ready when faced with this question at the proverbial cocktail party: mysteries, nature writing, biographies of renowned poker players. I would get bet good money that no reader has ever answered by saying that she likes to read about offices. Our modern workplaces, so goes the thinking, are just the sort of dreary, soul-deadening environments that we wish to escape when we read a book. Who would want to read about them?

Bringing hope to those left behind

Bringing hope to those left behind

When Jenny and Richard Bowen read a newspaper headline about the report – “U.S. rights group asserts that China lets thousands of orphans die” – they knew they had to do something. Sending money – where would they send it, anyway? – didn’t seem like an adequate solution to a crisis that involved the deaths of predominantly “unwanted little girls.”

Knowing God through The Potato Eaters
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Knowing God through The Potato Eaters

When friends of mine go to the Netherlands I tell them they have to experience three things. They have to order a loempia (Indonesian meat and vegetable roll) and eat it outdoors at a market; they must ride a bike through the dunes, and they must spend hours at the Van Gogh Museum drinking in his view of the world. Of the three, Van Gogh is the most important. And I’ve been reintroduced to his brilliance recently because I have been reading Henri Nouwen.